5 Smart Ways to Utilize iPad Technology at School

Students today have been around Apple technology for most, if not all, of their lives. This means that they do not know what to do if they are in a classroom for eight hours a day without electronics.

Technology is everywhere, and while it may sometimes bring unwanted texting into the classroom, it can also be extremely helpful when used to educate.

Here are five amazing ways to utilize iPad technology to capture your students’ attention, not distract them:

  1. Display Student Work to the Class

Accompanied with a projector or smart TV, iPads can be great for showing off students’ work.

Teachers not only can use iPads to display instructions, but also to give students positive reinforcement by showcasing their work on screen. iPad projection can be a great learning motivator and can simplify the sharing of ideas between teacher and student.

  1. Increase Interaction with Your Students 

With iPad technology in the classroom, there are multiple apps and educational programs that can increase student engagement and learning rates.

Some essentials are games like Kahoot, which help with course material review. There are also programs that let more reserved students notify the teacher when they do not understand a lesson. These iPads apps allow for a more fulfilling learning experience. With iPads, you can incorporate visual games into lessons that are fun and enjoyable!

  1. Manage Class Development

Teachers can use certain apps on the iPads to track their students’ progress, take attendance, and assign work.

These iPads make it exceptionally easier to keep larger classes on track. They also allow teachers to see if the class is understanding and completing the work that is assigned to them.

In large classes, the teacher has a huge responsibility: they have to keep everyone’s attention, often with only the aid of a whiteboard. iPads make getting through long lessons manageable and keeping up with students a reachable goal.

Some teachers worry about giving students access to iPads out of fear they’ll hurt the technology. An in-class iPad needs a protective case just like your own cell phone needs a Casely iPhone case. You can purchase these in bundles along with your iPad order.

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  1. Personalize Learning

A large reason that children fall behind in education is that they have to learn the same way as every other student in the class. If they’re enrolled in a subject that doesn’t come naturally to them, they have to work extra hard to keep up with the curriculum. These could benefit from their own device during lessons, which keeps them on track.

It is now commonly known that not every student has the same style of learning. But how to manage each child’s learning style when there are roughly 21 students to a classroom?

With iPads, it is easier than ever to personalize lessons to each child. An iPad can store specific user settings for each and every student in the classroom.

  1. Easily Create Instructional Content

iPads can be used for much more than instructional games and research. They are also incredibly helpful for creating instructional content that students can easily follow.

Teachers can use apps to create their own lectures, and students will follow on their iPads. This creates the opportunity for students to be more active in their own education, preventing common issues with paying attention in class.

In 2019, it is time that we do away with the notion that electronics in the classroom will only serve as distractions.

There are countless benefits to iPads in schools. Students are much more accustomed to trusting technology for information than anything else – why not take advantage of this?

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